The site has a lot of links, and the long form content that the site showcases is one of the reasons why it ranks so well.  Most of the content on the site is extremely focused, and very informative.  It's pretty typical that an article on this site is over 2,000 words.  While longer content doesn't always mean better, Google does base some of its ranking factors on how much content is on the page that covers the topic in its entirety.  The more in-depth the article, the more likely the user is to find the answer they were looking for, which is why this website has so many articles that rank very well.  Each article is very complete and provides great information on the topic.  If I had to guess, the site is probably making over $20k per month based on traffic estimates.
Always disclose your affiliate relationship. Most visitors will probably understand that graphic ads will lead to your getting paid, but if you write a review or use an in-text link as a recommendation, you want your readers to know that may lead to compensation as well. This ensures you retain transparency and trust with your readers, but also, it's required by the FTC's endorsement rules.
Matthew owns an internet marketing blog that has won many awards and has been featured on various big brand websites such as Entrepreneur and ProBlogger. Matt is known for producing outstanding high-quality content that sticks out from the competition. The blog specialises in producing high-quality tutorials and case studies that help with things like link building, social media and traffic generation.

Niche — Unless you’re Amazon, people don’t come to your site looking to buy both weed-wackers and moisturizing cream. Most websites have their products narrowed down to a specific genre, such as fashion, health, petcare, etc. If you’re wanting to go into affiliate marketing, your first plan of action is to determine what you’re selling. This step comes first because so many subsequent decisions depend on this answer. The type of website you make, the type of audience with which you engage, all of these are heavily influenced by your niche. If you’re having trouble deciding where to focus, do some introspective thinking to determine what you’re passionate about.


This is a little delayed on the uptake but I recently created an affiliate marketing site with a service model (personal stylist kind of like Stitch Fix but only using Amazon items so I don’t have any inventory). Right now it’s free(!) and ultimately will be significantly under the price point of Stitch Fix, Le Tote, others in terms of both fees plus there won’t be any apparel markup. It will be smaller scale as well and without a lot of the overhead. The operations have been a little tough but I’m starting to make money. I haven’t done much marketing yet but am learning as I go (I’m a data scientist by trade). Check it out! http://www.dressjungle.com . And I’d definitely love a callout 🙂
These figures demonstrate that Harsh has fully optimised his site for affiliate marketing. It also shows that when you’re first starting out with an affiliate marketing website, you can focus on just that. You don’t need to worry about monetising your website through any other means just yet. After you start generating a decent income from affiliate marketing then you can look at introducing other ways of making money.
Because the site is ranking #1 in Google for this (and probably ranks very well for other related terms), they are probably making great money.  This is probably easily a $100 to $200 a day website.  That's right, I would not be surprised if this site was pulling in $3k to $6k or more each month.  In fact it could be more, but its hard to guess without knowing all the traffic they are receiving.

My guess is that this site has a low CTR of 1 to 3% for Adsense.  It probably pulls in around 3k visitors for its primary keyword a month but is probably only making $100 to $200 in Adsense.  I have no idea how much they are pulling in from FastWeb, but my guess is that its not more than $100 each month.  My guess is that this site is definitely earning less than $300 per month.


It offers a modern, real-world, step-by-step guide to researching, launching, managing, and optimizing a successful affiliate marketing program. It covers social media, creating policies, working with feeds, coupons, widgets, and video, creating compelling content, handling partners who are not meeting goals, and much more. ‘Affiliate Program Management: An Hour a Day’ is the do-it-yourself guide to planning and maintaining a successful affiliate program.
SEO is one of the viable and reliable ways to drive traffic to an affiliate website. However, marketing using SEO can be very difficult due to its competitive and technical nature. In this book, Jason McDonald covers breaks down the process of optimizing your website for the search engines in seven steps. It focuses on helping you master the fundamentals and teaches you how build a successful SEO campaign in a practical manner that anyone can understand.
Market research/networking — When you become an affiliate marketer, you are hoping to establish yourself as a voice of authority in that specific industry or niche. In order to do so, you need to have a good grasp on who you’re talking to. Who are you trying to sell these products to? What kinds of copy or advertisements do they respond to? Do they prefer email marketing over social media marketing, or vice versa? Market research is a part of any advertising strategy.
Hi Rae, I think the right niche is the most important step in affiliate marketing. If you choose the wrong niche, you can be doomed from the very beginning. Need a buying niche not just one where people are looking for information. Also you only mentioned it briefly at the end, I think promoting something you know about or is your passion makes the process a lot easier. Great post though, Tom.
I kept on squandering to pick a best workable niche for affiliate marketing that has to offer me some decent income. Still, I couldn't stick to anything. By reading this article you have narrow down my options to explore. Now, I can filter out one of these few suggestions that deserve to be successful. Thanks for sharing few top blogs in each niche to navigate and get more ideas on a particular topic.
Additionally, feel free to seek out conversations with both consumers and other professionals. Send out LinkedIn invitations to those you think might be a good professional contact. Join Twitter conversations that are relevant to your industry or product. Physically attend networking events or conferences you think could result in a stronger network or more informed strategy. You’re a part of a community now, but other people don’t know that unless you show up.
For example, if I talk about how cool a product is, and then you find out that I’m an affiliate for them, wouldn’t you as a conscientious observer become skeptical as to whether my information is biased, if perhaps I’m only saying how cool something is because I can get paid for it? Wouldn’t that make you question my integrity with other things I say as well?
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