Most affiliates have wizards of varying degrees of sophistication that will guide you through creating the links you want. Smashwords keeps things the simplest. Scroll down to the bottom of any of their book pages, and, if you’ve signed up for their affiliate program, you’ll see a link you can simply copy and paste (it’ll already have your affiliate ID embedded).
The other competition, the one we want low, is the competition of the top 10 sites ranking in Google for that keyword. When we say low SERP Competition, it menas we are addressing the strength of the top 10 and thats made up of a series of factors which Spencer mentioned will be addressed in detail in future posts. But to name a few: Title, backlinks to page, and number of links to the ranking page. Hope that helps 🙂
Because 2Checkout exclusively sells software and digital products, it is best suited for established influencers whose target audience is interested in buying products in this niche. But while you won’t find any physical products for sale, 2Checkout is probably the market leader in selling software of every type, including very specific use case items (like software that can convert Microsoft Word documents to PDF, for instance).
I have one affiliate website that I recently launched. SEO hasn't been done yet other than basic stuff. What I need is an expert to look at it and tell me whether I'm on track or need major changes. I don't know if you guys do that here or know of someone who does. (free or for a fee) The site is http://saveongolf.net . It's a site using datafeeds for golf equipment.
First of all, your products shouldn’t be a scam. Many rookie affiliate marketers with good intentions make this mistake. Second, your stuff shouldn’t be visible in physical stores. It should be incredibly hard to find offline. Third, don’t settle for pennies. Since your items are of significance and people won’t mind paying for something useful, set the minimum price of the brands that you will promote to $50.
With all that being said, this site definitely gets some decent traffic and even if they were just participating in display ads and Amazon Associates as monetization, I'm sure it would make a significant amount of income.  Like BabyGearLab.com – people researching supplements are usually looking to buy something, and health food decisions are often impulse buys.  That means that this niche may convert better than others, especially because the price points of a lot of these products is on the lower end.  For an income “guesstimate” – I would say that this site is probably making north of 20K per month between affiliate and display ad revenue.
For example, if I talk about how cool a product is, and then you find out that I’m an affiliate for them, wouldn’t you as a conscientious observer become skeptical as to whether my information is biased, if perhaps I’m only saying how cool something is because I can get paid for it? Wouldn’t that make you question my integrity with other things I say as well? 
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